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Chronic rhinosinusitis severity is associated with need for asthma-related systemic corticosteroids

Volume: - Issue:

Firstpage: 0 - Lastpage: 0

K.M. Phillips - L.P. Hoehle - R.W. Bergmark - A.P. Campbell - D.S. Caradonna - S.T. Gray - A.R. Sedaghat

BACKGROUND: Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is highly prevalent in patients with asthma. However, no study has evaluated the effect of CRS severity on asthma-related oral corticosteroid use - a marker of poor asthma control and prognosis. We therefore sought to evaluate the association between CRS severity and asthma-related oral corticosteroid use.
METHODOLOGY: Prospective cross-sectional study of 110 adult asthmatic CRS patients. CRS severity was measured using the 22-item Sinonasal Outcomes Test (SNOT-22) and Lund-Kennedy endoscopy score. Number of asthma-related courses of oral corticosteroids in the past year was queried at enrollment. Association was sought between metrics for CRS severity and asthma-related oral corticosteroids use in the last year. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves defined whether SNOT-22 or endoscopy scores could be used for detecting asthma-related oral corticosteroid use.
RESULTS: The mean SNOT-22 score was 44.9 (standard deviation [SD] : 23.3) and mean endoscopy score was 4.1 (SD: 3.0). The mean number of asthma-related oral corticosteroid courses taken in the last year was 1.1 (SD: 1.9). SNOT-22, but not endoscopy score, was associated with requiring at least one course of asthma-related oral corticosteroids in the last year (odds ratio = 1.03, 95%CI: 1.02 - 1.06, p=0.003), which translates to an odds ratio of 2.0 for a 21-point increase in SNOT-22. ROC analysis identified equally optimal SNOT-22 scores of greater than 32 (sensitivity: 88.1%, specificity: 41.2%) or greater than 65 (sensitivity: 38.1%, specificity: 91.2%) for detecting the need for at least one course of oral corticosteroids within the past year.
CONCLUSIONS: CRS symptom severity is associated with past asthma-related oral corticosteroid use. SNOT-22 scores may be used as a versatile tool to screen for past asthma-related oral corticosteroid use in asthmatic CRS patients - i.e. those at greatest risk from their asthma - with either high sensitivity or high specificity.

K.M. Phillips - L.P. Hoehle - R.W. Bergmark - A.P. Campbell - D.S. Caradonna - S.T. Gray - A.R. Sedaghat - Chronic rhinosinusitis severity is associated with need for asthma-related systemic corticosteroids
Rhinology -: 0-0, 0000